Are moles tunneling through your lawn?

Are moles tunneling through your lawn?

Even during the winter months, like February, moles can be an issue.  I have one in my lawn now that I need to address.  They can do a lot of damage by tunneling.  However if you have moles it might be an indication that you have grubs and other insects in you soil.  Some are innocuous and some, like grubs, can do even more damage.

There are a couple of methods to either eradicate or deter moles.  Ideally you want to take away their food source so they won’t take an interest in you lawn in the first place.  Or you can approach the problem both ways.

Merit 0.2 grub fertilizer insecticide moles. Are moles tunneling through your lawn?

Merit 0.2 grub fertilizer insecticide moles. Are moles tunneling through your lawn?

If you’re on a regular fertilization schedule it’s common to include an insecticide as a preventive measure against white grubs.  However, some choose not include this in the program due to cost.  It’s good insurance if you want to avoid the possible damage from grub worms.  Not only do grubs eat the grass roots which seriously compromises your lawn.  But moles like to tunnel through your lawn looking for grubs to eat.  Raccoons can trash a lawn overnight digging up grub worms to eat as well.  visit our turf product page for other related products.

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An insecticide, such as Merit, will kill the insects which the moles are eating.   It’s best to water in granular insecticides after spreading.  Parallel with an application of a good insecticide.   You can also use a mole bait like Talpirid.  That way you’re attacking the issue at both ends.   When using Talpirid be sure to wear glove so they won’t detect your scent, as that will deter them from the bait.   It’s also important to try and establish their main tunnel.

Talpirid_mole_bait

Talpirid_mole_bait

The insecticide alone should be enough to drive off the moles if it’s watered in well.   You also need to consider the time of year it is. Usually from around April through September is ideal.  During the winter the grubs are deeper in the soil.  However, here in the southeast, we have had some very warm days.  So I’ve seen more activity than usual.  The soil is also not frozen and it’s easy for the moles to travel through.

UT professor becomes mole to study moles. 

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