Pesticide definitions.

Some pesticide definitions. With a few sample products.

Cide: “denoting a substance that kills.” The Oxford American College Dictionary, through Google.com

Pesticide “a substance used for destroying insects or other organisms harmful to cultivated plants or to animals.” The Oxford American College Dictionary, through Google.com

Pesticides are then broken down into more specific categories.

Herbicide “a substance that is toxic to plants and is used to destroy unwanted vegetation.The Oxford American College Dictionary, through Google.com  Example:  Speedzone is a selective herbicide which is engineered to kill off unwanted broadleaf weeds with little to no damage to desired turf.

Fungicide “a chemical that destroys fungus.” The Oxford American College Dictionary, through Google.com.   Example:  Eagle granular or Manicure Ultra are fungicides which target  fungus such as Brown Patch

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Insecticide “a substance used for killing insects.”   The Oxford American College Dictionary, through Google.com   Example:  Delta Dust.

Rodenticide  “a poison used to kill rodents.”  The Oxford American College Dictionary, through Google.com   Example:  Talpirid mole bait

talpirid_mole_bait

Selective herbicide  “Kills or significantly retards growth of an unwanted plant species without significantly damaging desired plant species.” The Oxford American College Dictionary, through Google.com  Example:  Speedzone is a selective herbicide which is engineered to kill off unwanted broadleaf weeds with little to no damage to desired turf.

SpeedZone, broadleaf herbicide for turf. With the season being so active this year Speedzone is a “hotter” product then the “Three-way” I been using. It also does not need a surfactant when mixing. Anxious to see what what kind of results this product will give.

Non-selective herbicide  “a chemical used in such a manner that all exposed vegetation is damaged.” The Oxford American College Dictionary, through Google.com  Example:  Round-up is a non selective herbicide.  Meaning it will kill or damage any vegetation it comes in contact with.

Post-emergent herbicide  “A herbicide that controls weeds after they emerge from the ground.”  The Oxford American College Dictionary, through Google.com.   Example: Round Up.

 Pre-emergent herbicide   “A herbicide that controls weeds before they emerge from the ground.”  The Oxford American College Dictionary, through Google.com.   Example: Snapshot, Preen.

pre-emergent,

Surfactant “A substance that tends to reduce the surface tension of a liquid in which it is dissolved.” The Oxford American College Dictionary, through Google.com   Often times a Surfactant is referred to as a sticker.   I.g.  Some products require a surfactant/sticker to be added to the mix.   I.g.  a herbicide can be washed off by rain.  If a sticker is added it will better adhere to the turf/weeds. 

Always read the label!   If you don’t understand the label speak to someone that does.   Yes, they are often times difficult to decipher.

Contact: usually refers to treating the foliage with a spray.

Systemic: usually refers to treating the plant via the root system i.g., a granular product that you spread.   Usually followed by watering in the product.

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